${site.data.firmName}${SEMFirmNameAlt} Main Menu
Call Today: 855-805-0595
To protect your safety during the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis, we “strongly encourage” telephone and video conferences, versus face-to-face meetings. Please contact our office today to set up a remote consultation. For more information, read our blog post.

Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, and Oklahoma Fathers' Rights & Divorce Law Blog

Is it the season for your divorce?

45183526_S.jpgIt has been known for some time that after the winter holidays, there is an uptick in divorce filings. Many people wait for the New Year, perhaps giving their children one last set of holiday gatherings with their family. But after those holidays, people reassess their situation and move on.

A recent university study has found that this increase in filings is mirrored in August. The researchers examined divorce records for counties in the state of Washington, noticed the February/March increase and were somewhat surprised to find a similar increase during August.

During a divorce, it is always tax time

40805158_S.jpgWhile tax season may be half a year away, if you are thinking about a divorce or deep in the middle of the process, you should remember to always consider the tax consequence of your choices. There are many elements of a divorce that affect your taxes and many of the financial elements of your divorce should be calculated in light of how taxes will affect the actual sum you may receive.

For instance child support and alimony or spousal support. If you have to pay both of those, you will feel it in your bottom line at the end of the year, as they both will come out of your pocket. As unpleasant as paying alimony may be, it does have one positive factor. It is tax deductable for you. And you will probably pleased to know that your former spouse will have to pay taxes on the portion he or she receives.

What is normal after a divorce?

50533103_S (1).jpgOne issue with a divorce is that it upsets the routines a family has grown accustomed to. A father and mother separate and the children are shuttled between them. What had been normal is no more and something has to fill that space. You can fill it with conflict, disputes and acrimony. Or you can decide to work with your child's other parent to do what is best for your children.

The hard part is what that will be, will be different for your child or children than for someone else's kids. For a parenting plan to both work and serve a child's best interest, both parents must work together. But what works may be very different than what you may have imagined as being "normal."

Make sure your spouse is not an 'accidental' beneficiary

55785782_S.jpgOne element of a divorce that may be lost in all of the emotional trauma and other legal dealings is the effect of a divorce on a will, life insurance or other estate plans. While it is likely that creating a child custody or parenting plan or dealing with issues related to child support may take much of your attention, you should not ignore these other aspects of your divorce.

If you have young children, it is not surprising that the parts of your divorce that deal with their custody arrangements and how their time will be split between you and your spouse will monopolize much of your attention. The details of your parenting plan are very important to raising your children and will also govern much of your interaction with your former spouse. Issues related to matters like life insurance and wills may seem distant and far less pressing.

Problems with your custody order?

27567495_S (1).jpgSummertime can bring hot weather to St. Louis and with that hot weather can come heated arguments among divorced parents over their custody obligations. A parent may be late to pick up a child and the other parent may decide to retaliate by refusing to exchange the child later.

This can quickly escalate into a battle of wills between the parents, with neither side wanting to compromise. If you run into this type of difficulty, where the other parent becomes uncooperative, you may become angry and frustrated. But whatever your emotions, don't try to get even. But make certain you document exactly what happened.

Back to school challenges after a divorce

39079909_S.jpgDivorce is, at its core, a legal procedure. In dissolves a marriage in Missouri, separating the property and debts of a couple. If you have children, it also contains the custody order or parenting plan that will govern the parent's relationship with their children and with each other until those children reach the age of majority.

Divorce is also an emotional experience made all the more so by the presence of children. As a divorced parent, you have to deal with your emotional feelings toward your former spouse and with your children in your new relationship as a part-time single parent.

Joint physical custody: is it right for your family?

41621163_S.jpgPreviously, we began speaking about current Missouri law, which does not provide that joint physical custody involves equal time with each parent. As we pointed out, the statutory language only guarantees "significant" time with each parent, which can obviously be up to the interpretation of the judge assigned to the case.

Lawmakers in both houses of Missouri congress have proposed changes to the law which would change the statutory language to ensure that parents with joint physical custody have basically equal time with the child. This would ensure greater fairness in the way judges assign parenting time in cases involving joint physical custody. 

Joint custody doesn't necessarily mean equal parenting time

20360301_S (1).jpgDivorce is typically a significantly disruptive event for everybody in the family, both couples and their children. Certainly, children are particularly vulnerable in the divorce process, and need the emotional and financial support of both parents during and after the process. The arrangement a couple has regarding parenting time can make a difference.

Under state law, there are two different categories of custody a family court has to look at when determining custody arrangements: legal custody and physical custody. The difference is that physical custody concerns which parent has possession and care of the child at what times, whereas legal custody refers to decision-making rights and responsibilities. 

Contact Our Team To Get Help Now

Tell us about your case and we’ll get back to you promptly.

Bold labels are required.

ERROR: Please enter a site level or form specific email address in the application.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Stange Logo

Stange Law Firm, PC
120 S. Central Avenue
Suite 450
St. Louis (Clayton), Missouri 63105

Toll Free: 855-805-0595
Fax: 314-963-9191
St. Louis Law Office Map

DHQ | Divorce Headquarters Divorce
Headquarters ® App Download The App
Questions? Live Chat Pay Your Bill Online
States of Service

Other Office Locations

  • Saint Louis County: 120 S. Central Ave., Suite 450, Clayton, MO 63105: Clayton Office
  • West County: 16024 Manchester Rd., Suite 103, Ellisville, MO 63011: Ellisville Office
  • Jackson County: 256 NE Tudor Rd., Lee's Summit, Missouri 64086: Lee's Summit Office
  • Jefferson County: 16 Municipal Drive, Suite C, Arnold, MO 63010: Arnold Office
  • St. Charles County: 2268 Bluestone Drive, St. Charles, MO 63303: St. Charles Office
  • Franklin County: 5 S. Oak St. Union, MO 63084: Union Office
  • Lincoln County: 20 Centerline Drive, Troy, Missouri 63379: Troy Office
  • Boone County: 1506 Chapel Hill Rd., Suite H, Columbia, MO 65203: Columbia Office
  • Greene County: 901 E. St. Louis, Suite 404, Springfield, Missouri 65806: Springfield, MO Office
  • St. Clair County: 115 Lincoln Place Ct., Ste. 101, Belleville, IL 62221: Belleville Office
  • Madison County: 25 Professional Park, Suite B, Maryville, Illinois 62062: Maryville Office
  • Sangamon County: 400 S. 9th St., Suite 100, Springfield, IL 62701: Springfield Office
  • McLean County: 1012 Ekstam Drive, Suite 4, Bloomington, IL 61704: Bloomington Office
  • Johnson County: 7300 West 110th Street, Suite 560, Overland Park, KS 62210: Overland Park Office
  • Sedgwick County: 2024 N. Woodlawn Street, Suite 407, Wichita, Kansas 67208: Wichita Office
  • Shawnee County: 800 SW Jackson Street, Suite 812, Topeka, Kansas 66612: Topeka Office
  • Tulsa County: 6660 S. Sheridan Road, Suite 240, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74133: Tulsa Office
  • Oklahoma County: 2601 NW Expressway, Suite 411 W, Oklahoma City, OK 73112: Oklahoma City Office
  • Monroe County: 116 W. Mill St., Waterloo, IL 62298 (by appt. only): Waterloo Office
  • St. Louis City: 100 S. 4th St., #549, St. Louis, MO 63102 (by appt. only): St. Louis Office
  • Jackson County: 2300 Main St., #948, Kansas City, MO 64108 (by appt. only): Kansas City Office

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision & should not be based solely upon advertisements. See additional disclaimers here.